Our first border crossing 😩

The next major obstacle in our South American travels – and one I was absolutely dreading – was the border crossing from Colombia to Ecuador. We’d read horror stories of night busses being hijacked, crossing the border itself taking hours and countless other problems. So, we decided to do it in 3 days in the hope that it would be easier. In the end, it was hellish. Enjoy; this is a long one! 

Day 1: Salento to Popayan

Admittedly, our starting point wasn’t the best as Salento was not only very far away from the border but also had no real bus connections to anywhere. The first step therefore was to get a bus to somewhere that did – Armenia (not the country FYI). That bus took just under and hour and then we had to find a bus to our next destination. We soon found out that only one bus company (apparently) go from Armenia to Popayan. Unfortunately, as it turned out, this bus was far from the luxury of our previous long journey. In fact, the bus was so old we were surprised it was still functioning. On the 7 hour journey we had no toilet and only a couple of toilet breaks. I was back to my old complaining self. 

When we finally reached Popayan we decided to walk (20 minutes) to our hostel. As soon as we left the bus terminal the heavens opened and it chucked it down. The two of us, our clothes, our shoes and our bags got absolutely soaked and we arrived at the hostel looking like drowned rats. We dried ourselves off and made it to the supermarket 5 minutes before they closed (more luck than judgement) to buy noodles and snacks. The one night stay in Popayan was uneventful and we just used it as a stopover.

Day 2: Popayan to Ipiales

The next day involved travelling to the last town before the Colombia-Ecuador border: Ipiales. At the bus terminal the same company we had used the day before tried to rip us off and then squeezed us onto a bus that was already full. We claimed 2 seats together at the back after complaining. We were pretty sure the bus was even older than the one from the day before. The journey itself was absolutely horrendous. The bus hurtled through the mountains and swung us from side to side for 8 hours straight. It also stopped at various points for no apparent reason. When we did reach Ipiales, we were travel-sick, exhausted and done with busses. We were looking forward to a good night sleep in the hotel that we’d booked. Unfortunately, it turned out that our ‘hotel’ was dirty, dowdy and dodgy (and not exactly a hotel). We didn’t feel safe being there and it was freezing. We wanted to be out of there as soon as we could.

Day 3: Ipiales to Quito

At 7am we left the hotel and hailed a taxi back to the bus terminal. ‘Collectivos’ (collective taxis) heading to the border were easy to find and cheap. When we got there we had to first get our exit stamps from Colombia. Now, Colombians are only in a hurry when it suits them so of course there was only one desk open. After a long wait, we were leaving Colombia and walked across the border into Ecuador. All done? Nope. Next we had to get our entrance stamps for Ecuador. As it turned out, Ecuadorians are not in an hurry either and we waited another hour here. The next step was a taxi to the local bus terminal in Tulcan. 

From there we had to get yet another bus, this time to Quito (our final destination). As soon as we got out of the taxi we were accosted by 3 men asking us where we were going. We were ushered onto a bus leaving “NOW” to Quito. Almost an hour later, after picking up more passengers at every bus stop in sight, we were on the way. The bus didn’t stop once for a toilet break but did stop countless times along the way for pick-ups and drop-offs. We had about a million different people trying to sell us everything from ice-creams to cooked meats. The 5 hour journey took almost 7 hours and ended up going nowhere near our hostel. So we jumped off and, after receiving the help of various kind Ecuadorians, found a bus heading towards our hostel. Eventually we made it and after 3 days of hellish bus journeys, needed a cold beer or 12. Hopefully the next border crossing won’t be so terrible…

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